Feature Articles

I have written feature articles and opinion pieces for a wide variety of publications including The Irish Times, UCD Connections, the Guardian, the Sunday Times, the Dubliner Magazine, Maternity and Infant, Woman Mean Business, Irish Tatler, The Gloss and various others. I am also a contributor to The Antiroom feminist blog and podcasts.

Here are links to some of my work:

THE GUARDIAN:

‘Sexist’ tax cut would benefit Ireland as a whole – Published on November 24, 2010

THE SUNDAY TIMES

Think tank: Small traderloans are a capital idea – Published on June 26, 2011

Think tank: Dutch girls have got it worked out – Published on March 27, 2011

Diaspora demand their say – Published on December 19, 2010

Think Tank: Pay the fat to eat less – Published on October 10, 2010

Think Tank: New ideas for the 21st century – Published on November 15, 2010

Welcome to the transumer society – Published on July 26, 2009

Think tank: Ireland will die without foreigners – Published on April 12, 2009

Think tank: Promote sex in the boardroom – Published on December 27, 2009

Think Tank: New Ideas for the 21st Century: A dirty blot on our landscape – Published on August 16, 2009

IRISH TIMES HEALTH PLUS FEATURES:

As Winter Recedes SAD Subsides – Published on March 6, 2012

The positive side of autism – Published on December 13, 2011

Painted Love – Published on November 22, 2011

Using Positive Thinking to Find Work and Self-Worth – Published on October 11, 2011

Shining a Healing Light on Skin Problems – Published on August 30, 2011

The 4am Wake-up call – Published on July 12, 2011

Tackling the Brain Head On – Published on July 5, 2011

Heels Over Head When it Comes to Footwear – Published on March 31, 2011

Keeping the Ethos of Hume Street Alive – Published on March 15, 2011

Tuning into Good Health in the Bath – Published on February 1, 2011

When will we accept that boys will be boys – Published on February 1, 2011

Not Just a Pretty Face – Published on November 20, 2010

Getting paid to Stay Healthy – Published on November 16, 2010

Girls United – Published on September 21, 2010

Giving Birth to Creativity – Published on July 13, 2010

Putting Body & Soul into a Festival – Published on May 4, 2010

Do Not Despair – Even the Fuyssiest Eaters will Relish Good Food Eventually – Published on March 30, 2010

Feelings of Guilt Fuelled by Anxiety – Published on January 26, 2010

IRISH TIMES TRAVEL FEATURES

Right Under Our Noses (City Break in Chester) – Published on May 8, 2010

Go Overnight – Actons Kinsale – Published on December 5, 2009

Cast a Stone & You’ll Hit a Hollywood Extra – Published on December 5, 2009

A Haunting We Will Go – Published on October 31, 2009

A Port in the Storm of History – Published on October 10, 2009

Jewel in the Fjiords – Published on April 11, 2009

Moorish Palace in the Heart of Saville – Published on February 14, 2009

Cracow Cafe Society – Published on June 28, 2008

OTHER SECTIONS OF THE IRISH TIMES:

The Book Club Bites Back – Published on October 6, 2009

Off The Wall – Published on November 8, 2008

Deja Ecoute – Published October 18, 2008

Alas, it seems inevitable that history will eventually repeat itself. As a result, it seems that the sound bites from 20 years ago are often uncannily appropriate for the world we live in today. Take, for example, the US presidential campaign of 1984, when Democratic candidate Walter Mondale surprised everyone by choosing a woman, Geraldine Ferraro, as his running mate. She said, “What are my sources of strength? My husband and my three kids, my health-care team, and my religion.” Sound familiar? This folksy tone was also adopted by another prominent female politician as, according to Margaret Thatcher, “Any woman who understands the problems of running a home will be nearer to understanding the problems of running a country.” In that same year, Jesse Jackson enjoyed the distinction of being the first black candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. Just like Barack Obama, he looked to the future, saying, “At the end of the day, we must go forward with hope and not backward by fear and division.” Current US president George W Bush might need to heed the old joke, as told by his 1980s counterpart Ronald Reagan, who said, “Recession is when a neighbour loses his job. Depression is when you lose yours.” It seems that US foreign policy hasn’t changed in the intervening decades either. In the aftermath of the bombing of Libya on April 14th, 1986, an action intended to prevent terrorist attacks apparently emanating from there, Reagan said, “If necessary we will do it again.” Beleaguered UK prime minister Gordon Brown might just mutter Thatcher’s line that “If my critics saw me walking over the Thames, they would say it was because I couldn’t swim.” However, he might take consolation from the words of the late economist JK Galbraith, who insisted that “The only function of economic forecasting is to make astrology look respectable.” Closer to home, it might have been appropriate for Taoiseach Brian Cowen to borrow from Charles Haughey on budget day and state that “If we are to achieve national recovery, it will involve a tremendous national crusade. Leadership and initiative are required at all levels.” During a television address to the nation on January 9th, 1980, Haughey also lectured, “We have been living way beyond our means. We have been living at a rate which is just not justified by the amounts of goods and services we have been producing.” Plus ça change.

So Did The Futurologists Get It Right – Published on October 18, 2008

Puting An End to Ageism & Compulsory Retirement – Published on May 19, 2008

Dublin Could Learn Lessons From London Over Mayor – Published on May 2, 2008

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